The Irish Jubilee, a song from Charles Lawlor

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The Irish Jubilee, a song from Charles Lawlor

In my quest to continue posting and also creating content that deserves more attention, on St. Patrick's Day I highlight a song called "The Irish Jubilee". Why this song? It's quick, fun and fascinating. It was written by none other than Charles Lawlor, the composer of the music for 1894's "The Sidewalks of New York". He is on the right in the picture linked to his name.

Two great versions of the song are below. And check out my new trailer for The Sidewalks of New York.

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Only 1 in 3,900

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Only 1 in 3,900

Almost 3,900 hours have passed since the September release of my free history documentary, The Sidewalks of New York.

It only takes one hour to watch.

Kick back tonight and experience the greatest story in New York history.

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Al Smith Poster in CNN Anchor Jake Tapper's Office

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Al Smith Poster in CNN Anchor Jake Tapper's Office

If ever anyone needed wonders if I exaggerated with my documentary the magnitude of Al Smith's life and political career when compared to the history of the United States, CNN anchor Jake Tapper's office might be a good place to look.

Credit: Brooks Kraft/ Getty Images

Credit: Brooks Kraft/ Getty Images

The largest poster in his office from several angles appears to be one for Smith. If you believe that CNN is "fake news" and that Tapper doesn't have credibility, I challenge that and tell you that anyone who understands the importance of Smith also understands and believes in his message. Smith was "a man for the people".

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3rd Anniversary for Tennessee Mountain View

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3rd Anniversary for Tennessee Mountain View

Three years ago today I released the abandoned exploration film Tennessee Mountain View.

The loss of the Mountain View Hotel changed the landscape of Gatlinburg, but it also changed the tone and tenor of the town. Or at the very least it showed how far leaders would go to compete for tourism dollars with ‘action-packed’ Pigeon Forge: a historic hotel was destroyed to put up carnival rides.

This sort of competitive utilitarianism drove much of the development of Sevier County for decades, leading to everything from rampant cabin-building on mountainsides to towns taking on hundreds of millions of dollars of debt to construct enormous events centers to attract tourists.

’Progress’ always trumped ‘preservation’ until the Great Recession. There seems to be a bit more awareness now of heritage, but it could be that banks just won’t loan money for some of the more audacious development ideas.
— Greg Johnson, Opinion Columnist, Knoxville News Sentinel

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